NiTRO Creative Matters

Perspectives on creative arts in higher education

Edition 18, 2018 – Australia’s arts and culture policy

By Jenny Wilson — It's a comfy bloody country 'Cos we know what's in our heart Beer and boots, not wine and suits Cricket - not art! [1]
By Rupert Myer AO — Things I’ve known, wish I’d known, have learned, unlearned or forgotten.
By Dr Abigail Gilmore — How research can support better arts and culture policy
By PJ Collins — It’s an interesting, if somewhat dismal, exercise to look at our perspective on future cultural/arts policy and then make educated guesses and observations on what Australians are actually going to get in the foreseeable future. Let’s start with the exciting one.
By Professor Peter Tregear — Any complete assessment of Australian arts and cultural policy needs to consider the effectiveness of the systems of funding that stem from it. Deciding what, and who, gets funded and what does not is, after all, where policy principle most conspicuously becomes practice.
By Dr Patrick Finn — Recently, I had a front row seat for a profoundly instructive story about Art and arts policy. I have worked as an artist, arts educator and sometimes policy-maker for more than thirty years. Something that just happened in Canada, shook my world to the core.
By Eileen Siddins — In the past few years, published reports have indicated concerning trends in creative artist mental health. For example, five Australian entertainment industry workers attempt death by suicide every week, [1] with those in the entertainment industry experiencing depression symptoms five times higher [2] than the general population (Eynde, Fisher & Sonn, 2016).
By Esther Anatolitis — A nation’s cultural policy is its most confident document.
By Associate Professor Sandra Gattenhof — When we look at the Australian cultural landscape not everyone’s story has a place within the cultural conversation. Scott Rankin’s recent Platform Paper Cultural Justice and the Right to Thrive is a powerful and timely tale for this time.
By Professor Justin O’Connor — There’s little doubt now: the arts in Australia are in a full-blown crisis. And it is not about funding alone.