NiTRO Creative Matters

Perspectives on creative arts in higher education

Edition 8, 2017 – Sharing common ground: Art, science and technology

By Jenny Wilson — The first edition of NiTRO went live on 30 June 2016 with a focus on the future for creative arts amidst the flurry of government research and higher education reports.
By Jenny Wilson — Collaborations across arts, science and technology are growing. It appears that the more that non-arts academics become involved with artists, the more they see how art can provide deeper insight into their own disciplines.
By Professor Robyn Sloggett AM — Art practice and scientific enquiry have the same fundamental epistemological requirements; a broad and deep knowledge of the context in which they operate, the ability to contest and extend existing ontologies, and through this to be able to verify propositions in order to expand knowledge.
By Professor Frank Millward — Living the dream immersed in data...
By Professor Patricia Aufderheide — Australia has one of the most restrictive copyright regimes in the world. Australian creators have fewer ways to access unlicensed copyright material than almost anywhere else.
By Professor Oron Catts — The life sciences are rapidly shifting into an engineering pursuit. This means that a new, problematic, challenging and performative palette of artistic possibilities opens up.
By Oliver Smith — Art and technology. Creativity and invention. Curiosity and innovation. The artist can confidently claim a preeminent position as a generator of new knowledge. Within the Academy the artist can play an important role in unlocking unforeseen research potential by imaginatively engaging with burgeoning technology.
By Dr Svenja J. Kratz and Anita Gowers — Since the establishment of UWA’s dedicated art and science lab SymbioticA in 2000, there has been a growing interest in fostering connections across art and science. An increasing number of academic staff and HDR students are working across the nexus of art and science at major Australian Universities including UNSW, Curtin, QUT, Monash and UTAS.
By Dr Jessica Seymour — Being a writer was always a romantic idea for me. I was a terribly antisocial child, and I liked the idea of hiding away in my bedroom for days – even months – on end and bashing away at a keyboard until a masterpiece came out. I was born in 1990, so a keyboard was part of my fantasy.
By Professor Kim VIncs — As I write, I’m in London, having spent the last day as a member of the User Board for EU Horizon 2020 project, WhoLoDance[i]. WhoLoDance is developing a motion capture data library of dance movement across the genres of ballet, contemporary dance, flamenco and Greek folk dance, and a suite of new technological tools for searching, matching, documenting, learning and sharing dance.